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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
writer steve moore also joins the panel. so, steve, this is really an interesting story that i don't think gets enough attention. >> i agree. >> paul: the reforms taking place across the country in a lot of states. who are the stars you're looking at? >> i entirely agreement with your premise, paul. if you look at, talk about the demise of the republicans on the national levels we're not seeing that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> so, they have the power and they are actually using it, af got states like kansas, and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you've got a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican, where they're aggressively promoting pro energy drilling policies to get at the national resources
economic writer steve moore also joins the panel. steve, this is really an interesting story that i don't think gets of attention. the reforms taking place across the country in a>> lot of states. who are the stars you are looking at? >> i entirely agree with your premise, paul. if you talk about the demise of the republicans on the national level, we are not really seeing that on the state level. 30 republican governors today in america. the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina. so the south now is almost entirely republican whereas justen 25 years ago it was pretty entirely democratic. it is not just the south. states like utah and idaho and others. >> what are they doing with that power? that's the interesting thing. >> so they have the power, and they are using it. you have states like kansas and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you have a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican and are aggressively promoting pro energyer drilling policies to get at the pir natural resources. and the big story you ment
presidential candidate howard dean, steve moore of the "wall street journal" editorial board, author of "return to prosperity." steve, i begin with you. we have from the "wall street journal" editorial page costco's dividend ta dividend as tax epiphany. taxes matter, steve. even though there are a lot of people in this world who think not. >> they matter a whole hell of a lot. it was very predictable these companies would be starting to pay deluges of dividends now. if you pay them now your shareholders only pay 15%. if you wait six weeks they have to pay as high as 40, 42, 45% depending on where that rate ends up. so taxes do matter. it's affecting behavior. let me sayhist my good friend howard dinos this, laimplarry. when he was a governor he cut taxes not raised them to make his state more productive. you should be advising this president not to raise those rates. >> steve i was hoping to get some help from you. you know very well, one of the things we can both agree on the deficit is out of control. >> that's for sure. >> you know as well as i do that the best deal for deficit hawks, leavin
rake, only on the money you make on the margin. stephen moore is here from the wall street journal and he's ready to jump out of his skin after i said that. he specializes in telling me why i'm wrong. and our other guest, david johnston wrote "the fine print." stephen, you are our resident anti-tax crusader. i totally agree every penny counts when it comes to your own money. when you compare the taxes most americans paid in past decades i don't get why republicans are screaming bloody murder about this. what would be so bad with the wealthiest among us chipping in a little bit more? i'm emphasizing just a little bit more. >> when you showed that chart of the tax rates that was exactly accurate. we had 70% tax rates in the '70s. that didn't turn out well. then we cut the rates significantly. went down to 50%, 28%. the rates went up to 35%. i would love to see you super impose on that chart the share of taxes paid by the rich. here is the interesting thing. >>> one of the reason the deficit went down is you had a big increase in the number of people making money. they paid more tax.
's christopher lance moore, things didn't go as planned when he allegedly broke into a home in texas. the man holding moore at gun point when he found him at his home. his stepson says moore should be lucky to still be alive. >> it was a bad night probably. he was going to try and run or something and that i was gog have to shoot him or my stepdad would have to shoot him. >> gretchen: so moore now facing burglary charges. brian? >> brian: former republican senator alan simpson can legislate, but i didn't know until now that he can actually dance. ♪ . >> brian: that is fantastic. 81-year-old getting down and drawing attention to the fiscal cliff. he made this as part of a nonpartson group because you can not be partisan and do gangam style. the can kicks back, they're urging young americans to help solve the nation's crisis. simpson was one half of the simpson bowles commission tasked with tackling the debt and deficit. >> gretchen: the reason he didn't kick the can was because he had a plan that you wouldn't have to kick the can. you would actually put our fiscal order better off. speaking
. dagen: thank you very much. we want to bring in steve moore to ask him quickly if there's enough time to get a deal done. he's senior economics writer at the "wall street journal," author of "who is the fairest of them all" and steve now that i introduced you, we're going to have to go to the new york stock exchange to hear wait till the sun shines which the traders sing every time this time of year. i'm going to pose the question to you. apologies if i need to interrupt you. is there enough time to get a deal done? >> yeah, there is. peter is exactly right that the modus operandi and capitol hill and the white house for the last 30 years is every time they are up against the deadline, they are like the high schoolkid who has to finish thesis paper. they wait till the last minute. so dagen, i'm making a prediction that on december 31st, you and i will probably be talking and i think they will be furiously negotiating and i think they probably wiil reach a deal. let me make one other point if i may, let's say it doesn't happen on december 31st, it's going to happen in january. it is no
chris moore is retiring after res than two years on the job. after less than two years on the wood -- after less than two years on the job. >>> a decision may come on whether sonoma marin area rail transit will get a big chunk of federal transportation money. officials asked for $6.6 million to buy more train cars at this year's prices. however, the sonoma county transportation authority says it only has $10 million in funding. >>> it's 7:38. want to check in with sal. see what's happening in the east bay. pretty busy there, sal. >> it's busy. one of the main reasons is the bay bridge is such a mess. it usually has a chain reaction on all of the freeways that get close to the bay bridge. let's go to the 24 freeway. westbound 24 is busy here in la fayette between walnut creek, you have a lot of slow traffic and right when you get out on the slow side, 580, it's jammed. another stall on the bridge. we've had four broken brown -- dash broken down cars. look at the carpool lane. that's slow. we're looking at delays between 40 minutes and an hour for some cars trying to get into san fra
. i am at a loss for words when you are done. stephen moore, i do hope you come back and see us soon. >> thank you, sir. stuart: here is an example of what i call tax hypocrisy. costco founder going to save because of the dividend payment this year. not next year, this year. the ceo, he is a very big obama supporter. even spoke at the democratic convention. >> a president who understands what the private sector needs to succeed. a president who takes the long view and makes the tough decisions. that is whh i am here tonight supporting president obama. stuart: supports president obama, supports tax the rich, but does not pay the rich taxes. i say tax hypocrisy and i am being very mild. >> i agree. every time i hear the rich guys say, you know, i want to pay more taxes. i say, you know what, if you want to do that, why don't you donate some money to the country. stuart: he borrows the money -- >> borrowings $3.5 billion. stuart: and then costco was downgraded. >> this kind of payout is done with earnings from a company. money is free right now. stuart: have they no shame, in my persona
moore. this is an important issue in your bill is still needed. now the cftc proposed rule is helpful. there's no question they have created an exception for enter affiliate swaps that applies to nonfinancial end-users. the problem is there are two key issues, two problems not addressed by the cftc will. everyone, nonfinancial end-users have an eight step process or a criteria process financial users must meet and what criteria is posting margin between affiliates. again, if you have been a post variation merger between affiliates, the whole point behind an exemption from clearing requirements is defeated because your costs are roughly similar if you have the margin. second and very importantly there are lots of companies in your district and throughout the country that have treasury hedging centers in the cftc will doesn't do anything to exempt trade. if you have a nonfinancial end-user facing the market, if what that hedging centers set up to do this and turned to swaps, that hedging center would be a financial entity. so now you have a financial to financial swap is not eligible fo
? joining me now, senior economics writer or for "the wall street journal" steve moore. steve, thanks for making it in today. >> hi, jamie. we're having a white christmas in chicago. so it is a lot of fun. jamie: i know chicago, burr. the numbers are also pretty chilling for retailers who do what percentage of their business during the holiday season? >> you know, those months of november and december are absolutely crucial, jamie, for the retailers. about 40 to all their business all year is done in those two holiday months. so it's, not very good news that the retail numbers came in, you called them lackluster. and that's probably putting it charitiably. this was the worst year since 2008. it is actually, surprising, jamie, because if you look at some other indicators, consumer confidence had actually bumped up a little bit in the last couple months. we have, i wouldn't read too much into this because other indicators of the economy are looking up right now. jamie: so do you think it's an anomaly that it isn't going up? is it an indication if we go over the fiscal cliff there's conc
markets and see. guy wolf is macro strategist at marex speculation and jim moor yo is on constantly on cnbc. unless there's more than one of him. joining from the cme. as i said, a cnbc contributocon. guy, i'll start with you. i just referenced and we had jason trennert say the same thing, traders used to just mainline like fed 85 billion a month. that used to give us a great -- >> how do you know about that? mainline? >> because they're -- >> because they're addicts, traders. and they don't care about structural. they don't care about anything but gimme, gimme from the fed. they weren't even impressed by 85 billion until 2016. are the benefits of this policy to just not be apparent, and the negative effects, you know, coming more into the fore? >> yeah, i mean. a couple of factors. first is the fed are not the only ones out there quantitative easing. when they started they were the only central bank out there, so it had an unusual effect on their currency. whereas now it's much more -- keeping up with everyone else. as things roll off they have to do more just to keep things neutra
. >> a little kiss. happy holidays. >> to you, as well. >> i saw demi moore just throwing herself at -- anyway, coming up, pictures -- coming up, president obama with a new proposal to avoid the fiscal cliff. but are we really closer? we're going to ask democratic senator kent conrad in a few minutes. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 glk350 for $399 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. at your local ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insuran
hikes and spending cuts. joining us from washington, republican congresswoman shelly moore capito. were you privy to everything that was happening yesterday? >> i was shocked when we went into the conference at 7:45 and the speaker, after offering this serenity prayer, said merry christmas, you're going home, we're not putting the vote up, we don't have the votes. i was disappointed, quite frankly. >> really? is it overstating it to say that, you know, some people characterize it that the president was not accepting the surrender of the gop anyway, so why not keep fighting? >> we needed to strengthen the speaker's hand in negotiations and i think by saying and reiterating that we didn't want taxes to go up by 98.1% of the population i think is a strong statement for us to go. we had -- would be moving one of the rates, and i think that that was a concession on our maert and i was disappointed we weren't able to send that over to the senate and say to them, all right. your turn. >> yeah, i know. but all these games. everybody knew the senate wouldn't take it up. the president promised he
of the processors and storage. by the way in storage there's something called moore's law in processing, storage the greater change is double every nine months than 18 months. twice the rate. so but the point is in the technology world you have to think about the companys producing innovation not producing products and services in order to stay ahead of the curve. >> jonathan, you want to pick up on this? >> i'm sorry. i'm a philosopher. i don't know how to innovate. and what strikes me about innovation, of course, is that -- this is something the president gave us a good example a few minutes ago, retroviruses and basic medical science turned into very important, as part of the treatment, and understanding of hiv-aids. years later. if you think of the internet it was packet switching, then turned into the internet and finally the web. there's a myth about americans that we only care about application n fact we are the most effective basic science producers in history. now, the founders, to use an overused cliche, had innovation in their d.n.a. the articles of confederation required standards of
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)